Monthly Archives: June 2012

BYOD Tweet Chat Wrap up – Policy, Scale, and Why BYOD

On June 20th, 2012 I hosted a very lively tweet chat on BYOD sponsored by Dell and Microsoft. Many thanks to all the partipcants! Click for a recap of question 1 or here for a recap of question 2 or here for a recap of Question 3. The Tweet Chat ended with discusion of BYOD policy, scalability, and Why BYOD.
 

































Link in Tweet:BYOD Required for Retention? Bollocks!






Link in Tweet:Mobility and Employee-Owned Devices

 

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BYOD Tweet Chat Recap – Q3 – What are the security risks of BYOD?

On June 20th, 2012 I hosted a very lively tweet chat on BYOD sponsored by Dell and Microsoft. Many thanks to all the partipcants! If you weren’t able to participate don’t fret! Over the next week or so I’ll recap all the action play-by-play so you can feel like you were right there! Click for a recap of question 1 or here for a recap of question 2. Question 3 was a real hot button – BYOD and Secuirty!
 








Link in Tweet:Dell Mobile Security and Control







Link in Tweet:Firesheep


















Link in Tweet:Dell Mobile Security and Control


















Link in Tweet:BYOD – Bringing your own demise to the workplace

 

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BYOD Tweet Chat Recap – Q2 – What are the financial advantages/challenges of BYOD

On June 20th, 2012 I hosted a very lively tweet chat on BYOD sponsored by Dell and Microsoft. Many thanks to all the partipcants! If you weren’t able to participate don’t fret! Over the next week or so I’ll recap all the action play-by-play so you can feel like you were right there! Click for a recap of question 1. The second question sparked much debate – BYOD – Cost Saver or Burden? What do you think? Post a comment and let us know!
 

Link in Tweet:You saved how much?

Link in Tweet:The Ugly Truth About BYOD

Link in Tweet:IBM Faces the Perils of “Bring Your Own Device”

Link in Tweet:BYOD – A Cost Saver or a Curse

 

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BYOD Tweet Chat Recap – Q1 – Is BYOD Effective or Necessary?

On June 20th, 2012 I hosted a very lively tweet chat on BYOD sponsored by Dell and Microsoft. Many thanks to all the partipcants! If you weren’t able to participate don’t fret! Over the next week or so I’ll recap all the action play-by-play so you can feel like you were right there! Today we’ll tackle the first question.

Link in Tweet:Bring Your Own Device – The New Mobile Productivity Standard for Your Business

 

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remotelyMOBILE live at Mobile Connect

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I’ll be coming to you live from Boston this week at Mobile Connect. Stay tuned for updates!

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Tweet Chat: 5 Steps to Managing BYOD in Business

Next week I’ll be hosting the ‘5 steps to managing BYOD in business’ Tweet Chat on twitter sponsored by Dell and Microsoft.  We’ll be discussing the most important factors for successfully managing a workplace where BYOD is becoming a permanent occurrence. This will include:

  • Managing employee expectations
  • Managing security risks and data loss
  • Managing and organizing network infrastructure to support consumer devices
  • Managing staff and providing a support structure
  • Managing and creating corporate platforms that highlight the best features of a consumer platform

Don’t miss what will be a fun and informative chat! Come prepared to join in the conversation and with your questions on BYOD and Consumerization of IT.

 

When?

June 20th, 2012 at 1PM Eastern (Noon Central,  10AM Pacific)

 

Where?

Twitter Hashtag: #DellBYOD

If you haven’t done a tweet chat before, check out TweetChat( http://tweetchat.com/). It is a great tool to keep you tuned-in to the conversation. Use the #DellBYOD hashtag to join in.

What can I Win? (say wha!?)

During this chat you can register to win a DELL™ LATITUDE™ E6230! http://del.ly/tweetchat620

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.  Ends 06/20/2012.  To enter and for Official Rules, visit http://del.ly/tweetchat620 #DellBYOD”

 

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The Skinny on Mobile ‘Lacklications’

There was some light-hearted discussion yesterday on twitter surrounding Brian Katz’s open solicitation for suggestions of mobile ‘crapplications’. For the un-initiated, crapplication is a term to describe the effect scope-creep has upon an application lifecycle. Right about the time when you can start applying the 80/20 rule to an application, it has become a crapplication. Katz wrote a great article on it last fall that you should check out if you haven’t already.

As Katz writes, “a crapplication is really just a term for a bloated desktop application…an application that is bloated with many useless features for the majority of users.” He continues to say, that a crapplication “makes it difficult to figure out how to manipulate your data,” by which he means a bad user interface and user experience.

To build upon Katz’s idea of a crapplication, as well as what’s dogging me at the moment in my mobile-only quest, isn’t so much bloat and bad UI (though there is some of that), it is the lack of functionality in many of the apps I use.  From my experience, the current state of mobility isn’t in a state of bloat, but one of anemic proportions. Many mobile apps need some good old-fashion functional protein to put a little meat on their bones. The skeleton is there, but some of the basic features are just missing. I’m not seeing a lot of crap, but rather a lot of lack. These functional weaklings could be considered ‘Lacklications’.

For example, office productivity apps lack word count, track changes, and a table of contents. Blogging apps are missing features such as scheduling, comments, and preview. I have to use the web front end to accomplish this. The native version of apps such as Lync and OneNote are missing painfully basic features. The native Android email client doesn’t let me access notes or tasks in exchange. I could go on and on, but you get the idea.

Some of the cause for emaciation is due to market /platform/apps maturity. Some of it is due to the screen real-estate of the device itself – the small size limits and dictates some functionality. Some of it is due to the fact that certain functions are just not possible in a mobile context. Whatever the reason, it is painfully obvious that you can see the rib-cage of many mobile apps.

But here is the good news. Mobile is new! Mobile is exciting! Mobile is acting as one big, fat reset button not only for many enterprises, but app vendors as well. As I have written about recently, they are using mobility as the excuse to re-examine how ‘we’ve always done things’. They are looking at how we can perform functions and processes in a more efficient manner.   Hopefully this means there is opportunity for loads of excess functional fat to be left on the chopping block. This will also hopefully translate into clients working with app vendors to assure that the right pieces of functionality are being developed.

Who knows, perhaps one-day in the near future, I’ll be cursing my bloated mobile ‘crapplications’ with specialized functionality intended for just a select few and a bad UI to boot.  Hopefully, the mobile context will guide and spur just the right level of development. The question for the future of mobile apps is – are they going to exercise and eat a healthy diet to build functional muscle or are they going right back to the same fatty diet? Typical human behavior says bad habits are hard to break – but what do you think?

Benjamin Robbins is a Principal at Palador, a consulting firm that focuses on providing strategic guidance to enterprises in the areas of mobile strategy, policy, apps, and data. You can follow him on Twitter or connect on LinkedIn.

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The BYOD Smackdown!

Last week I participated in a really great podcast regarding enterprise mobility. Entitled BYOD SMACKDOWN it featured:

The discussion was moderated by Pete Erickson, Founder of MoDev and Disruptathon

Click here to listen!

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The Consumerization Of Office

Today, Google announced the acquisition of Quickoffice.  For those who don’t know, Quickoffice is arguably one of the better office productivity suites currently available for mobile platforms (also check out OfficeSuite 6 by MobiSystems). Quickoffice allows users to view, create, and edit Microsoft Office compatible Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents. Quickoffice is available cross-platform on Android, iOS, and Symbian.

In the void created by the absence of a mobile version of Microsoft Office, Quickoffice has taken a strong leadership position. However, until yesterday this was done so (not to detract from the product) by an upstart company that could be competitively explained away; my how the stakes have changed. With the acquisition, it has moved from an interesting gap filling measure to a strategic threat from a competitor who doesn’t lack in cash, competition, or cause. Make no bones about it; Google has its competitive sights on Microsoft Office via the mobile platform. (They also bought DocVerse a few months back ) If there wasn’t already immense pressure in Redmond to get a cross-platform mobile version of their popular Office suite out, it just doubled.

First, from a competition perspective, all mobile enterprise office productivity discussions will be framed through the lens of a Google/Microsoft battle. The temptation to turn this into a clash of the titans is just too great for tech writers to avoid doing so.  Second, the functionality Microsoft offers will have to be, at a minimum, at least what Quickoffice offers. Based on Microsoft’s ability to deliver mobile capabilities of other Microsoft products I have some real reservations. OneNote for Android is barebones, as is the Lync client. Microsoft doesn’t yet have the track record to deliver fantasist mobile apps outside of the Windows Phone platform. Microsoft seems to be perpetually behind on the mobile front.

However, the biggest challenge Microsoft faces isn’t Google, but rather the consumer. Consumers have come to expect in the mobile arena that they call the shots.  I would even go so far as to say they feel entitled to call the shots (not that it is always a good thing). This is expressed in the enterprise as the Consumerization of IT. The Consumerization of IT denotes the idea that technology shouldn’t be overly complex. It should be something that the average consumer can understand. When you combine the sense of entitlement with the Consumerization of IT, the end result is often manifested with end users doing an end-run around the IT department to use the apps and devices they like best. My good friend, Philippe Winthrop, Managing Director of the Enterprise Mobility Foundation, calls it the IT-ization of the Consumer.  This attitude, coupled with a product from a viable competitor, should set off major alarm bells in Redmond.

Microsoft is in danger of having consumers do an end-run around Office – call it the Consumerization of Office. With a solid enterprise office suite alternative (provided Quickoffice can deliver the Track Changes functionality) Microsoft will quickly lose one of their greatest strongholds in the enterprise.  Without a similar product offering by Microsoft, the acquisition of Quickoffice by Google only hastens this loosening of the grip of Microsoft Office dominance in the enterprise. While Microsoft continues to develop their offering on the sidelines, Google has a staggering advantage to secure market share.

Mobile consumers have demonstrated time and again they will abandon the dominant paradigm en masse in favor of functionally that is available now rather than wait for the old guard to catch up. Users want/need/must perform office productivity tasks on their mobile devices and they are finding workarounds wherever they can. The greater the proliferation of mobile devices in the enterprise, the more of a requirement it will be to consume office documents from those devices.  Savvy consumers are not going to sit around and wait for Microsoft to provide the solution when an alternative is in front of them.  The question that remains is – How will Microsoft respond and will it be substantial enough and in-time to satiate the empowered consumer?

Benjamin Robbins is a Principal at Palador, a consulting firm that focuses on providing strategic guidance to enterprises in the areas of mobile strategy, policy, apps, and data. You can follow him on Twitter or connect on LinkedIn.

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